Unlock the Past in Seattle

with Blaine Bettinger and Maurice Gleeson

Presenters



Blaine Bettinger 
(United States)

Blaine Bettinger, Ph.D., J.D., is a professional genealogist specializing in DNA evidence. In 2007 he started The Genetic Genealogist (www.thegeneticgenealogist.com), one of the earliest blogs on the topic. Blaine is the author of The Family Tree Guide to DNA Testing and Genetic Genealogy, and co-author with Debbie Parker Wayne of the award-winning Genetic Genealogy in Practice, the world’s first genetic genealogy workbook. He also co-authored “Genetics for Genealogy” with Judy Russell in 2018’s Professional Genealogy: Preparation, Practice & Standards (ProGen PPS) (Elizabeth Shown Mills, Author and Editor).

Blaine is or has been an instructor for genetic genealogy courses at the Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research (IGHR)Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy (SLIG)Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh (GRIP), and Virtual Institute of Genealogical Research. Blaine is a graduate of ProGen Study Group 21, a trustee for the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society’s Board of Trustees, and a board member for the Association of Professional Genealogists.

Unlock the Past events
   – Unlock the Past in Seattle (Sep 2018)
– DNA Down Under with Blaine Bettinger (Aug 2019)

Blaine’s presentations

Using Y-DNA and mtDNA to Explore Your Ancestry – Y-DNA and mtDNA testing are the workhorses of genetic genealogy, and have helped genealogists break through thousands of stubborn brick walls. Learn about the unique inheritance of Y-DNA and mtDNA in your family, how these tests can be used to explore your ancient ancestry, and how the results can identify your relatives both close and distant.

Using Autosomal DNA for 18th and 19th Century Mysteries – Even though our 18th and 19th century ancestors have been dead for decades, their DNA still survives in their descendants. Learn how to use autosomal DNA to attack and potentially solve genealogical mysteries and brick walls for ancestors who were born or lived in the 1800’s, 1700’s, and beyond. Together we’ll also examine some of the ways that leaders in the field have attacked or solved their 18th and 19th century mysteries using autosomal DNA

Using Third-Party Tools to Analyze Your Autosomal DNA – Although DNA testing companies provide their own analysis of test results, there are third-party tools that allow test-takers to learn even more about their genomic heritage, including admixture calculators and the identification of genetic cousins. Together we’ll explore one of these tools, GEDmatch, and learn how how to use some of the many powerful tools GEDmatch offers.

Phasing and Mapping Your DNA – Phasing is the process of identifying what DNA you inherited from your mother, and what DNA you inherited from your father. Learn how to phase your DNA results, and how you can use that phased DNA. We’ll also learn how to map segments of your DNA to specific ancestors using chromosome browsers and third-party tools. By testing relatives and using known matches you can map significant pieces of DNA to your genealogical family tree!


 

Dr Maurice Gleeson (England)

Maurice is Education Ambassador for ISOGG (International Society of Genetic Genealogy), a member of the APG, and organiser of Genetic Genealogy Ireland (the annual national conference on DNA & genealogy). He was born in Dublin where he trained as a medical doctor. He is currently a psychiatrist, a pharmaceutical physician, and a part-time actor as well as a genetic genealogist.

His father had been researching the family tree on and off for 30 years and in 2006 Maurice decided to join in the fun, quickly becoming addicted. Together they have toured Ireland, found a variety of ancestral homelands, and reconnected with cousins internationally, both through traditional genealogical methods and through DNA. It continues to be a wonderful adventure. Most recently Maurice has discovered he is probably a direct relative of JP Morgan and Princess Diana.

Maurice did his first DNA test in 2008 and has never looked back. Now he is administrator of several Surname DNA Projects, including the Gleason, Spearin, Farrell, O’Malley, & Maloney Projects. He also works with adoptees and with people of unknown parentage to help them reconnect with their biological family. In association with this work, he has appeared on Irish TV as a consultant for the TV series Adoption Stories. He authors several blogs (DNA and Family Tree Research, Genetic Genealogy Ireland, and blogs associated with his surname projects) and is a regular contributor to genealogical magazines (Irish Roots, Irish Lives Remembered). His YouTube videos on genetic genealogy are very popular and have won him international recognition (his YouTube channel is called DNA and Family Tree Research).

He has organised the DNA Lectures for “Genetic Genealogy Ireland” in Dublin and “Who Do You Think You Are” in the UK since 2012, and has given talks all over Ireland, the UK, and internationally. He was voted “Genetic Genealogist of the Year 2015” (SurnameDNA Journal) and “Superstar Genealogist, Ireland” in 2016 and 2017 (Canada’s Anglo-Celtic Connections).

Unlock the Past events
   – 14th cruise
– Unlock the Past in Seattle (Sep 2018)

Maurice’s presentations

Challenges with Irish genetic genealogy – Researching in Irish records can be challenging and brick walls tend to impede our progress beyond the 1800-1830 timepoint. However, DNA testing can be a useful tool to complement Irish research. This talk will explore how to use your DNA results to augment your use of Irish records.

Tracing your immigrant ancestor to Ireland – a strategic approach – For many Irish-Americans, all they know is their ancestor “came from Ireland” but they have no further information than that. This talk gives an overview of the various techniques & records available in the US (and elsewhere) that can be used to help trace your ancestor back to where they came from in Ireland. These include shipping records, emigration records, but also surname dictionaries and distribution maps.

Navigating Irish birth, marriage & death records – In the last year or so, many of the civil registration records are coming online. Most of these are available for free via www.irishgenealogy.ie and digital images of the original record can be downloaded. Civil registration started in 1864 for most records. Prior to this, one has to rely on church records for tracing further back and these can be very helpful indeed or not at all – coverage is patchy and most records peter out around 1800-1830. However, all of Ireland is covered by two websites and most of this research can be done from the comfort of your own home.

Newspapers, gravestones & probate: rich sources for Irish genealogy – This talk explores the wealth of genealogical material to be found in newspapers, cemeteries, probate, petty session court records, & dog licenses. We will also explore some of the resources that everyone should be using as a routine part of their ongoing Irish research.



Cyndi Ingle 
(United States)

Cyndi is the creator, owner and “webmaster” of the award-winning web site Cyndi’s List of Genealogy Sites on the Internetwww.CyndisList.com, a categorized index to more than 333,000 online resources. In its first three years, Cyndi’s List was three times voted the best genealogy site on the World Wide Web. It helps millions of visitors worldwide each month and has been featured in the media and diverse publications, including ABC News, NBC News, USA Today, Time, Newsweek, Parade Magazine, Wired, Family Tree Magazine, Family Chronicle, and Internet Genealogy magazines. Cyndi has been interviewed for many television and radio broadcasts including ABC News, NBC News, the BBC, and National Public Radio. She has also participated in the Ancestors II television series on PBS.

Cyndi, a genealogist for more than 35 years, is a past-member of the board of directors for the National Genealogical Society. Cyndi is an internationally known guest lecturer for various genealogical society meetings and seminars (www.CyndisList.com/speaking-calendar). She has lectured for the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy, GENTECH, Brigham Young University, the Federation of Genealogical Societies, the National Genealogical Society, the Washington Library Association, the Florida Library Association, the American Library Association and numerous local genealogical societies in the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom. Cyndi has authored numerous articles and three books. Before her life on the Internet, Cyndi worked as an international banker specializing in foreign exchange and computer networks. Cyndi, her son, Evan, and three Boston Terriers live in Edgewood, Washington)

Website: www.cyndislist.com

Unlock the Past events
   – 8th cruise
14th cruise
– Unlock the Past in Seattle (Sep 2018)

Publications (and more about Cyndi) – www.cyndislist.com/aboutus

Cyndi’s presentaion

The Hidden Web: Digging Deeper – When Google and traditional search engines don’t return useful information, don’t stop there. We will explore resources that are invisible to Google and hidden deep within web sites and proprietary databases. The “hidden web” lies buried within the collections for commercial web sites, libraries, archives, and museums. We will also talk about the importance of indexes that deep-link into web sites online, thus uncovering hidden gems of information that may not be found easily through a search engine query.


 

Wayne Shepheard (Canada)

Wayne Shepheard graduated in Geology from the University of Calgary and spent over 40 years applying his knowledge and expertise in the exploration for oil and gas, primarily in Western Canada. Following retirement, he has spent his time mostly doing family history research, exploring ancestral relationships in North America, Europe and the United Kingdom. Wayne also is active in expanding his interest in and writing about natural phenomena and their impacts on people and communities.

His view is that humankind has always had to adapt to the ever-changing physical environments in which they lived. In is his genealogical work, Wayne has been particularly mindful of stories concerning families that were both negatively and positively impacted by changes to their habitat and to disasters which sometimes overwhelmed them.

He volunteers as an Online Parish Clerk, handling four parishes in Devon, England. He is an author of several articles published in a number of different family history publications and has made a number of presentations to local societies. Wayne writes a regular genealogical blog, Discover Genealogy, set up to tell stories, relate experiences and pass along tips discovered during his genealogical studies.

Wayne lives in Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

Unlock the Past events
   – Unlock the Past in Seattle (Sep 2018)

Web site – Discover Genealogy blog

Publications
Surviving Mother Nature’s tests: The effects climate change and other natural phenomena have had on the lives of our ancestors

Genealogy and the Little Ice Age – Wayne’s presentation at this conference
As genealogists we seek information about our ancestors from as far back in time as possible. That being said, not all researchers may be familiar with the term, but some of the most important records we find were created during the time of the Little Ice Age.

The Little Ice Age was a climatic period that lasted from about AD 1300 to 1850, a time in history when, from a physical or environmental standpoint, in comparison to the warm periods that preceded and followed it, was characterized by:

  • substantially cooler temperatures around the globe
  • mostly unstable weather
  • more frequent and intense storms
  • especially challenging food production
  • harsh living conditions

All of these factors had enormous impact on the lives and livelihoods of people and contributed to famine, spread of disease, social unrest, injury to being and habitat, and, in some cases, migration.

Summarizing of vital data began in earnest during this time. Apart from purely religious reasons or to establish hereditary claims, it may have been instituted in response to the need for more accurate rolls for churches and governments in identifying individuals from whom they could raise funds to support expanded social programs – parish relief efforts, poor laws and workhouses – involving the care of their citizens, more of whom fell into dire straits as the Little Ice Age progressed.

Because the Little Ice Age is the time frame that most coincides with genealogical research, it is important to understand the physical conditions under which people lived in order to assemble the most complete histories of families.

This presentation will hopefully bring perspective to the study of the generations of families who lived through the time of the Little Ice Age.